Congressman Exposes Billion Dollar Vaccine Company Ties to Facebook’s Fact Checker — Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

By Matt Agorist On Wednesday, Congressman Thomas Massie — who is known for calling it how he sees it — tweeted a bombshell claim about factcheck.org, one of Facebook’s most prominent “fact checking” groups. In short, Massie claimed that the folks fact checking claims on vaccines are funded in part by an organization that holds […]

Congressman Exposes Billion Dollar Vaccine Company Ties to Facebook’s Fact Checker — Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

Some Experts Say Facebook’s Launch of Libra Cryptocurrency is Company’s ‘Most Invasive and Dangerous Form of Surveillance Yet’ — BCNN1 – Black Christian News Network — Truth2Freedom’s Blog

Facebook is launching cryptocurrency next year that will allow people to move money from their smartphone into a digital “wallet”. The currency is known as Libra, which the social network says it has “no special role” in governing and will manage equally with a group of big companies. Experts have branded the move a dangerous […]

via Some Experts Say Facebook’s Launch of Libra Cryptocurrency is Company’s ‘Most Invasive and Dangerous Form of Surveillance Yet’ — BCNN1 – Black Christian News Network — Truth2Freedom’s Blog

Facebook Insider Confesses All ~ June 16, 2019 — Rose Rambles…

Editor’s Note: My, my…what have we here? This is a report generated by American intelligence Media bringing our attention to a substantial case against Mark Zuckerberg, the supposed “genus” who derived Facebook. Isn’t it interesting that the very day the US military ended a very similar project…Facebook was started by Mark? Well, spurned lovers doe […]

via Facebook Insider Confesses All ~ June 16, 2019 — Rose Rambles…

Facebook Mistakenly Stored Millions of Users’ Passwords in Plaintext

hacking facebook account passwords

Holy moly, Facebook is again at the center of a new privacy controversy after revealing today that its platform mistakenly kept a copy of passwords for “hundreds of millions” users in plaintext.

What’s more? Not just Facebook, Instagram users are also affected by the latest security incident.

So, if you are one of the affected users, your Facebook or Instagram password was readable to some of the Facebook engineers who have internal access to the servers and the database.

Though the social media company did not mention exactly what component or application on its website had the programmatic error that caused the issue, it did reveal that the company discovered the security blunder in January this year during a routine security check.

In a blog post published today, Facebook’s vice president of engineering Pedro Canahuati said an internal investigation of the incident found no evidence of any Facebook employee abusing those passwords.

“To be clear, these passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook, and we have found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed them,” Canahuati said.

Canahuati didn’t mention the exact number of users affected by the glitch, but confirmed that the company would start notifying its “hundreds of millions of affected Facebook Lite users, tens of millions of other Facebook users, and tens of thousands of Instagram users.”

Also Read:

Facebook has now fixed this issue and recommended users to change their Facebook and Instagram passwords immediately.

 

“In the course of our review, we have been looking at the ways we store certain other categories of information — like access tokens — and have fixed problems as we’ve discovered them.”

Besides this, all Facebook and Instagram users are always highly recommended to enable two-factor authentication, login alert feature, use a secure VPN software, password manager, and physical security keys to protect their accounts from various type of sophisticated cyber attacks.

This is yet another security incident for Facebook. In October last year, Facebook announced its worst-ever security breach that allowed hackers to successfully steal secret access tokens and access personal information from 29 million Facebook accounts.

However, Facebook is not alone that exposed hundreds of millions of its users’ passwords in plain text. Twitter last year also addressed a similar security incident that unintentionally exposed passwords for its 330 million users in readable text on its internal computer system.

Have something to say about this article? Comment below or share it with us on Facebook, Twitter or our LinkedIn Group.

Breaking News!! Class Action Lawsuit v Facebook Just Launched – Facebook Community Are NSA – CIA – DARPA Designated Targets — Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

Originally posted on Truth To Power: The Tech Giants Are All Working In Conjunction With Each Other, Facebook, Google, Twitter, YouTube, Amazon Are All A Part Of A Dominant Globalist Cabal Formed To Take Complete Control of the Individual. See Below Regarding Class Action Lawsuit. We announce the opening of Class Action Law Suit v…

via Breaking News!! Class Action Lawsuit v Facebook Just Launched – Facebook Community Are NSA – CIA – DARPA Designated Targets — Rangitikei Environmental Health Watch

Merging Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram: a technical, reputational hurdle

Merging Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram: a technical, reputational hurdle

Merging Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram: a technical, reputational hurdle

Posted: February 7, 2019 by

Secure messaging is supposed to be just that—secure. That means no backdoors, strong encryption, private messages staying private, and, for some users, the ability to securely communicate without giving up tons of personal data.

So, when news broke that scandal-ridden, online privacy pariah Facebook would expand secure messaging across its Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram apps, a broad community of cryptographers, lawmakers, and users asked: Wait, what?

Not only is the technology difficult to implement, the company implementing it has a poor track record with both user privacy and online security.

On January 25, the New York Times reported that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had begun plans to integrate the company’s three messaging platforms into one service, allowing users to potentially communicate with one another across its separate mobile apps. According to the New York Times, Zuckerberg “ordered that the apps all incorporate end-to-end encryption.”

The initial response was harsh.

Abroad, Ireland’s Data Protection Commission, which regulates Facebook in the European Union, immediately asked for an “urgent briefing” from the company, warning that previous data-sharing proposals raised “significant data protection concerns.”

In the United States, Democratic Senator Ed Markey for Massachusetts said in a statement: “We cannot allow platform integration to become privacy disintegration.”

FTC Negotiating Multi-Billion Dollar Fine For Facebook’s Privacy Scandals; Violating 2011 Accord —

By Aaron Kesel Facebook is being accused by the FTC (Federal Trade Commission) of privacy violations and is in the midst of negotiating over a multi-billion dollar fine that would settle the agency’s investigation into the social media giant’s privacy concerns. The massive fine according to several news sources is not disclosed, although it’s said that…

via FTC Negotiating Multi-Billion Dollar Fine For Facebook’s Privacy Scandals; Violating 2011 Accord —

Facebook Paid Teens $20 to Install ‘Research’ App That Collects Private Data

Facebook Paid Teens $20 to Install ‘Research’ App That Collects Private Data

facebook app download

If you are thinking that Facebook is sitting quietly after being forced to remove its Onavo VPN app from Apple’s App Store, then you are mistaken.

It turns out that Facebook is paying teenagers around $20 a month to use its VPN app that aggressively monitors their smartphone and web activity and then sends it back to Facebook.

The social media giant was previously caught collecting some of this data through Onavo Protect, a Virtual Private Network (VPN) service that it acquired in 2013.

However, the company was forced to pull the app from the App Store in August 2018 after Apple found that Facebook was using the VPN service to track its user activity and data across multiple apps, which clearly violates its App Store guidelines on data collection.

Onavo Protect became a data collection tool for Facebook helping the company track smartphone users’ activities across multiple different apps to learn insights about how Facebook users use third-party apps.

Facebook’s Paid Market Research

Now according to a report published by TechCrunch, Facebook has been doing much more than just collecting some data on its users—this time in the name of an app called “Facebook Research” for iOS and Android since at least 2016.

In some documentation, this program has been referred to as “Project Atlas.” Facebook has also confirmed the existence of the app to the publication.

The report said the company has been paying people aged between 13 and 35 as much as $20 per month along with referral fees in exchange for installing Facebook Research on their iPhone or Android devices, saying it’s a “paid social media research study.”

Instead of downloading the app via any app store, Facebook has been using third-party beta testing services—Applause, BetaBound and uTest—that specifically runs ads on Instagram and Snapchat recruiting participants to install Facebook Research.

Facebook Research App Collects Troves of User Data

The app requires users to install a custom root enterprise certificate, which gives the social media giant the level of access that can allow it to see users’ private messages in social media apps, non-e2e chats from instant messaging apps, emails, web searches, web browsing activity, and ongoing location information.

Although it is not clear if Facebook is accessing this data, but if the company wants it could, according to security researcher Will Strafach, who was commissioned by the publication.

In some instances, the Facebook Research app also asked users to take screenshots of their Amazon order histories and send it back to Facebook.

According to the Facebook Research’s terms of service, installing the app gives the company permission to collect information about other mobile apps on a participant’s smartphone as well as how and when those apps are used.

“This means you are letting our client collect information such as which apps are on your phone, how and when you use them, data about your activities and content within those apps, as well as how other people interact with you or your content within those apps,” the terms read.

“You’re also letting our client collect information about your internet browsing activity (including the websites you visit and data is exchanged between your device and those websites) and your use of other online services. There’re some instances when our client will collect this information even where the app uses encryption, or from within secure browser sessions.”

Facebook Acknowledges the Existence of the Program

While acknowledging the existence of this program, Facebook said, “like many companies, we invite people to participate in research that helps us identify things we can be doing better.”

Since Facebook Research is aimed at “helping Facebook understand how people use their mobile devices, we have provided extensive information about the type of data we collect and how they can participate. We do not share this information with others, and people can stop participating at any time.”

Though Facebook’s spokesperson claimed that the app was in line with Apple’s Enterprise Certificate program, but since Apple requires developers to only use this certificate system for distributing internal corporate apps to their own employees, “recruiting testers and paying them a monthly fee appears to violate the spirit of that rule,” the report reads.

Apple is “aware” of the issue, but it is unclear if the iPhone maker might ban Facebook from using its Enterprise Developer Certificates or not.

In response to the report, Facebook said the company is planning to shut down the iOS version of its Research app. BetaBound, uTest, and Applause have not yet responded to the report.

https://thehackernews.com/2019/01/facebook-research-app.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheHackersNews+%28The+Hackers+News+-+Security+Blog%29&_m=3n.009a.1916.gm0ao0d966.16iv

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